Logie Bruce-Lockhart (1955-1982)

Logie-Bruce-Lockhart-croppedA profound humanity is perhaps what best characterises Logie Bruce-Lockhart.

From teaching stock, he served with the household cavalry, being one of the first British soldiers to enter the notorious Belsen concentration camp. Forthright, strong-willed, yet always kind and good-humoured, Logie trusted and supported his staff and pupils, often championing the individual and unorthodox.

He is a countryman through and through, enjoying fishing, bird-watching and fungi-hunting. His considerable sporting prowess won him five rugby caps for Scotland. A love of classical music and water colour painting, with a talent for journalism complete the picture of this cultured man. It is perhaps as the raconteur that Logie is best remembered, though, his hilarious stories and brilliant public speaking being much quoted.

Within three weeks of becoming headmaster Logie was welcoming the Duke of Edinburgh to Gresham’s to celebrate the quarter centenary. Changing times in the 60s and 70s led to the introduction of a School Council, changes in sixth form uniform, and the advent of co-education. Shooting and sailing flourished and the reputation of the School grew nationally during Logie’s tenure. Although his absent mindedness was a Common Room legend, this benign but powerful figure would be a very hard act to follow.